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10 Things Most People Don’t Know About Chiropractic

  1. Pain is the last symptom of dysfunction.

A patient’s back is often restricted or unstable for months or years before it presents as a problem and they show up in a chiropractor’s office. In addition, the absence of pain is not health. While medication may be needed, if you take a pill and the pain goes away, the dysfunction that caused it still persists. Muscle, ligament and joint injuries often occur as a result of long-term biomechanical dysfunction, sometimes from past injuries, making the area more susceptible to future injury.

 

  1. Athletes use chiropractors to stay well and perform better, not just for the occasional injury. 

Athletes choose chiropractors because we are movement specialists. Chiropractors were spotted all over the Olympic coverage last year, and top athletes such as Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, Michael Phelps, Tom Brady, Evander Holyfield, and Arnold Schwarzenegger have all been proud patients of chiropractors. These days it’s far more common than not for major athletes and sports teams to keep chiropractors nearby to help prevent injuries, speed injury recovery, improve balance and coordination, and give them a greater competitive edge.

  1. The body does not perform as a cluster of separate mechanisms, but rather a cascade of events that all starts with proper control by the nervous system.

The nerves that travel through and control every function of your body originate at the spinal cord and their transmission may be disrupted if the joints of the surrounding spinal column are not moving properly. This disruption in biomechanical integrity combined with altered physiological function is what chiropractors call a subluxation. It is not uncommon for a chiropractor to treat a patient with mid-back pain who also suffers from irritable bowel system, a patient with a subluxated sacrum who has been unsuccessfully trying to become pregnant, or a patient with an upper back fixation and acid reflux.

  1. Doctors don’t do the healing.

Sorry to disappoint you, but a chiropractor will never fix your back. What we are able to do is restore proper motion in the joints, which relieves tension on the nerves and muscles and allows your body to do the healing that it is inherently made to do. As chiropractors, we believe that the body is a perfect organism in its natural state, and all disease comes from a disruption in the body’s proper transmission of signals by the nerves which affects its ability to heal and to defend against disease-causing agents. We never treat disease. We assess to find which spinal levels are causing the dysfunction, and we adjust it to restore proper nerve flow so the nervous system may work as efficiently and effectively as possible.

  1. Chiropractic is for all ages.
    Many seniors aren’t aware of the benefits of chiropractic care which can help them not only with pain relief, but also increase range of motion, balance and coordination, and decrease joint degeneration. There’s no patient too young for chiropractic either! Chiropractors check infant’s moments after birth for misalignments of the upper vertebrae that may occur as a result of the birth process. In addition to supporting overall health and well-being, parents also take their children to chiropractors to encourage healthy brain and nervous system development, to assist with colic, asthma, allergies, bed-wetting and sleeping problems, and to assist with behavioral disorders.

 

  1. We know about more than your backbone!

This surprises many people who had no idea that chiropractors give advice on nutrition, fitness, ergonomics and lifestyle, screen for conditions unrelated to the musculoskeletal system and refer out to other practitioners when necessary. Chiropractors are also able to complete specialties in other areas such as pediatrics, sports rehabilitation, neurology, clinical nutrition, and addictions and compulsive disorders.

Other than particular specialties and the differences in learning to adjust and learning to prescribe medication, our training hours are not dissimilar from that of medical doctor. The following are the classroom hours for basic science requirements compiled and averaged following a review of curricula of 18 chiropractic schools and 22 medical schools.

 

  1. Successful chiropractic patients accept responsibility.

When somebody says that they tried chiropractic and it didn’t help, I cringe and get the feeling that they really missed the boat. Of course, there are cases with complicating factors, but I have heard this from people with straightforward chiropractic problems when it is very clear what has happened here. In most cases, one doesn’t acquire back pain overnight, and it’s not going to go away overnight. If a weak core from years of sitting at your desk is to blame for the additional stress on your joints, I would expect an adjustment to provide relief, but once the condition is no longer exacerbated, I would most definitely prescribe some exercises for you to do at home. I might also suggest we evaluate your nutrition if I suspect an inflammatory diet may be wiring you for pain. Sure, I’m always happy to adjust someone and make a living, but if you’ve been given homework and you don’t do it, I better not hear you say chiropractic didn’t work when you’re hurting again!

 

  1. Chiropractic may help you get sick less

Studies have indicated that adjustments consistently reduce the production of pro-inflammatory mediators associated with tissue damage and pain, and may also enhance the production of immunoregulatory complexes important for healthy immune system defense. As far back as the deadly flu pandemic of 1917-1918, chiropractors noticed that their patients seemed to have fewer fatalities than among the general population and were able to publish their work in an osteopathic journal since no scholarly journals were accepting chiropractic data. The estimated death rate among patients of conventional medical care in the U.S. was estimated at 5 to 6 percent while the fatality rate among influenza cases receiving spinal adjustments was estimated at 0.25%.

  1. “I heard I’ll have to go forever” is a myth.

You may want to go to your chiropractor forever once you’ve started because you didn’t realize how great getting adjusted is, but your doctor won’t expect you to come for continuous care without symptoms. Generally, if you come in with pain, once you’ve been treated for your initial complaint, you’ll be scheduled for a few more appointments to make sure proper motion is being maintained, and then it will be recommended you return occasionally to be checked just like you would go to the dentist to get checked for tartar buildup and cavities. Of course, many people still choose to see their chiropractor weekly or monthly for wellness or maintenance care.

 

  1. Adjustments don’t hurt

There is no bone snapping or warrior-style pulling heads off spinal columns! The neck adjustment some chiropractors use causes anticipation for many new patients, but is actually much gentler than they imagined, and involves a quick, direct thrust to a specific spinal bone. The sound an adjustment makes is called a cavitation and is only space being created within the joint causing gasses to be released from the joint capsule, which creates the popping or cracking noise. Also, chiropractic adjustments will not wear out your joints, as some imagine because they have been warned not to “crack their knuckles” for this reason in the past. Adjustments, unlike “knuckle cracking” or having your friend stomp on you while you lay on the carpet, are applied specifically to improve the motion of your joints and limit the small dysfunctions that over time can lead to arthritis. Most people after an adjustment describe the feeling as being “lighter”, having greater ease in moving the body, and being able to stand up taller.

Clinical Effectiveness of Osteopathic Treatment in Chronic Migraine: 3-Armed Randomized Controlled Trial Complementary Therapies in Medicine

April 2015; Vol. 23; No. 2; pp. 149—156

 

BACKGROUND

 

The primary measurement outcome in this study is the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6); below is the conclusion from the cited reference:

 

“Our study shows that the HIT-6 is a reliable and valid tool for measuring the impact of headache on daily life in both episodic and chronic migraine sufferers. Furthermore, the HIT-6 tool discriminates well between chronic migraine, episodic migraine and non-migraine patients. As a brief tool, the HIT-6 is easy to score and interpret, and can be readily integrated into clinical practice, or clinical studies of migraine patients. It may offer clinicians a practical and easy-to implement tool to assist them with evaluating treatment effectiveness by obtaining input directly from the patient on aspects other than just the frequency of headache days.”

 

KEY POINTS FROM THIS STUDY

 

1) “This osteopathic manipulative therapy trial is the largest ever conducted on migraine adult patients.” These authors assessed the effectiveness of manipulative treatment on 105 chronic migraine patients using:

• Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) questionnaire [main outcome measure]

• Drug consumption

• Days of migraine

• Pain intensity

• Functional disability

 

2) This is a randomized controlled trial. Patients received 8 treatments over a period of 6 months. Patients were randomly divided into three groups:

• Manipulation + medication therapy n=35

•• The manipulative techniques used in this study included myofascial release, treatment of ligamentous and membrane tensions, treatment of somatic dysfunctions, and treatment to asymmetries and imbalances in the pelvis and cranium.

• Sham manipulation + medication therapy n=35

•• The sham group received a false manipulation, in addition to drug care.

•• Sham therapy mimicked the manipulative care in terms of evaluation and treatment; it used light manual contact to ‘‘treat’’ the subject.

•• Both manipulative and sham therapy sessions lasted 30 minutes and were given weekly for the first two sessions, biweekly for the subsequent two, then monthly for the remained four sessions.

• Medication only n=35

 

3) “Migraine attacks are usually characterized by a unilateral and pulsating severe headache, lasting 4—72 hours, and are often associated with nausea, phono- and photophobia.”

 

4) “Migraine is a serious public health concern of considerable consequences to both the migraineur and society.”

 

5) The overall migraine prevalence in Europe is 10—15% of the population.

 

6) These authors make the following points pertaining to the etiology of migraine:

• In 20% of migraineurs, the attacks are anticipated by transient neurological symptoms, the aura.

• Migraine has a genetic etiology in about 50% of cases.

• Migraine etiology also has multifactorial epigenetic mechanisms.

• During a migraine attack, high levels of inflammatory cytokines are released causing neurogenic inflammation of the meninges and transmitting pain signals to the trigeminovascular system and autonomic nervous system nuclei.

 

7) Criteria considered for manipulative evaluation and treatment were:

• Alteration of tissue consistency

• Asymmetry

• Range of motion restriction

• Tenderness

 

8) During migraine attacks, high levels of pro-inflammatory substances are released, altering neural autonomic pathways.

 

9) Manipulation influences the autonomic nervous system by producing a parasympathetic effect, and therefore, a “trophotropic tuning state.”

 

10) Manipulation is associated with a “reduction of pro-inflammatory substances.”

 

11) Manipulation in migraineurs could reduce the release of pro-inflammatory substances that have an effect on the autonomic nervous system function. “As a consequence, a cascade of biological and neurological events, potentially based on a rebalance of the abnormal activation of the habituation/sensitization mechanism, even between attacks, could occur resulting in an overall improvement of clinical outcomes.”

 

12) Manipulation “significantly reduced the frequency of migraine.”

 

13) At the end of the study period, there was a statistically significant difference on the overall HIT-6 score between the three groups; the manipulation group was statistically improved from control [drug only] and sham group.

 

14) “Considering migraine days per month, the three groups differed significantly at the end of the study period.”

 

15) Manipulation “significantly reduced the number of subjects taking medications.”

 

16) “No study participant reported any adverse effects of the [manipulation].”

 

17) “Migraine attacks, use of drugs, pain and disability scores were significantly reduced in the OMT group.”

 

18) “OMT showed a significant improvement in the migraineurs’ quality of life.”

 

19) Interestingly, the “sham group significantly reduced the HIT-6 score compared to the conventional [drug only] care. “The magnitude of the results suggests that the sham procedure may be clinically effective.” [Important]

 

20) The sham treatment used soft touch, which will induce responses at different levels of the central nervous system, reducing pain and improving well-being.

 

21) “The use of osteopathy [manipulative therapy] as an adjuvant therapy for migraine patients may reduce the use of drugs and optimize the clinical management of the patients.”

 

22) “The present study showed significant differences between OMT group compared to drug and sham groups, suggesting that OMT may be considered a clinically valid procedure for the management of patients with migraine.”

 

COMMENTS

 

It is important to look at the numbers in the table and the graph in this Review. Again, it is noteworthy that sham manipulation is superior to drug-only treatment for migraine. Note that manipulation essentially eliminated migraine days per month, pain, disability, and reduced drug consumption by 80%. Note that for the group assigned to taking drugs-only, there was essentially no reduction in migraine days per month, pain, disability, and no reduction in drug consumption.

 

Our interpretation of this data is that it appears that manipulation is actually addressing the causative pathophysiology of migraine headache; in contrast, it appears that taking drugs is nothing more than temporary pain control with no benefit to the causative pathophysiological of migraine headache. We remain perplexed as to why any healthcare delivery system would favor drugs for migraine (and many other pain syndromes) over mechanical therapy.

Glucose Metabolic Changes in the Brain and Muscles of Patients with Nonspecific Neck Pain Treated by Spinal Manipulation Therapy:

A [18F] FDG PET Study {a radioactive glucose PET scan study}. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Volume 2017

The study has four important findings:

• The brain is affected by chiropractic adjusting

• Chiropractic adjusting inhibits pain

• Chiropractic adjusting inhibits muscle tone, improving ranges of motion

• Chiropractic adjusting inhibits sympathetic tone, a key influence on immunity and other factors in systemic wellness

 

PET (positron emission tomography) scan is a powerful neuroimaging technique to investigate neuronal activity in the human brain and muscles.

18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is a radioactive analogue of glucose, and is an excellent imaging marker of brain glucose consumption (brain metabolic activity).

A PET scan can visualize brain metabolic changes induced by spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). The aim of this study was to investigate changes in brain and muscle glucose metabolism using positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose.

Twenty-one male volunteers were recruited for the present study. Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) was applied using an Activator in accordance with the Activator Methods protocols. The Activator applied impulses to specific vertebrae or joints. “SMT was performed on the subject in a prone position without movements such as cervical rotation, lateral flexion, and extension, in order to prevent the muscular FDG uptake due to muscle contractions during the therapeutic procedure. SMT was carried out on the whole spine, the scapulae, the ilium, and the sacrum, as necessary for each subject. The mean number of SMT adjusted sites was 8 per subject.”

Glucose metabolism of the brain and skeletal muscles was measured. Also measured was salivary amylase levels as an index of autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, muscle tension, and subjective pain intensity. “Other measurements indicated relaxation of cervical muscle tension, decrease in salivary amylase level (suppression of sympathetic nerve activity), and pain relief after SMT.” “SMT on all subjects was performed by the same Chiropractor, who was an advanced practitioner of Activator Methods.”

KEY POINTS FROM THIS STUDY

1) Spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) has “been applied mainly to musculoskeletal problems such as neck pain or low back pain.”

2) Previous studies have shown that “SMT has beneficial clinical effects, including pain relief and reduction of blood pressure.”

3) “The intensity of subjective pain was evaluated using a 0–10 visual analog scale (VAS) before and after SMT in the treatment condition.”

4) “Cervical muscle tension was measured bilaterally at the superior part of the trapezius muscle using a tissue hardness meter.”

5) “Salivary amylase levels were measured for each subject using an amylase monitor to evaluate changes in autonomic nervous system (ANS) function.”

6) “Salivary 

Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Improves Heart Surgery Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial Annals of Thoracic Surgery

(The Society of Thoracic Surgeons)

 

January 18, 2017; Vol. 16 [epub]

Vittorio Racca, MD, Bruno Bordoni, MS, Paolo Castiglioni, PhD, Maddalena Modica, MS, Maurizio Ferratini, MD

 

Cardiology Rehabilitation Center and Biomedical Technology Department, Santa

 

Maria Nascente Institute-IRCCS, Don C. Gnocchi Foundation, Milan, Italy

The aim of this study was to assess whether osteopathic manipulative treatment

 

(OMT) contributes to post heart surgical sternal pain relief and “improves

postoperative outcomes.”

 

Eighty post-sternotomy patients were randomly allocated to receive a standard ,cardiorespiratory rehabilitation program alone (control group) or standard cardiorespiratory rehabilitation with spinal manipulation. Pain intensity and respiratory functional capacity were quantified by the Visual Analogue Scale score and by a standardized breathing test, at the start and end of rehabilitation.

 

KEY POINTS FROM THIS ARTICLE:

 

1) “Controlling sternal pain after heart surgery is important to reduce the risk of postoperative complications, but pain is often undertreated because of contraindications and side effects of analgesic drugs.” Postoperative pain

“diminishes patients’ ability to cooperate, delays recovery and may lead to worse outcomes.”

2) “Inadequately controlled postoperative pain negatively affects the immune system, wound healing, and pulmonary function.”

3) Pain can “activate the sympathetic system, increasing demands on cardiac function and favoring cardiac complications such as tachycardia, arrhythmia, or myocardial ischemia.”

4) “Uncontrolled postoperative pain is often responsible for neurologic

complications, episodes of delirium, and other acute confusional states with a multifactorial pathogenesis.”

5) “In addition to discomfort and suffering, pain may cause sleep deprivation, may delay return to normal functioning, and may have nociception-induced adverse effects on cardiovascular functioning and pulmonary morbidity.”

6) Pain intensity was measured using a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS)

ranging from “no pain at all” to “unbearable pain.”

7) The improvement in respiratory function was more marked in the

[manipulation] group. “The inspiratory volume was significantly greater in the [manipulation] group.”

8) “Hospitalization was significantly shorter in the [manipulation] group than in the control group (19.1 ± 4.8 versus 21.7 ± 6.3 days).”

9) “Anti-inflammatory drugs may impair renal function, interact with platelet

aggregation, and increase the risk of gastrointestinal damage and bleeding;

analgesic drugs have detrimental neurologic effects and negatively affect visceral motility; and opioids may decrease survival during in-hospital resuscitation and increase duration of hospitalization.”

10) The manipulation in this study began the day after being discharged from the surgery department, and was administered for 5 days.

11) At the end of rehabilitation:

• The manipulation group had a lower Visual Analogue Scale score.

• The manipulation group had higher mean inspiratory volume.

• The manipulation group had shorter stays.

 

“At the end of the rehabilitation program, the reduction in perceived pain was more marked in the [manipulation] group and the VAS score was significantly lower in [manipulation] patients than in controls.”

 

13) “The combination of standard care with [manipulation] is effective in

inducing pain relief and functional recovery, and significantly improves the

management of patients after heart surgery with sternotomy.”

14) These authors reference articles that show spinal manipulation does the

following:

• “Intervenes in the process that transforms nociceptive information into the

subjective experience of pain.”

• “Controls pain after abdominal surgery.”

• “Facilitates recovery of functional ability after coronary artery bypass graft

surgery.”

• “Improves cardiac function.”

• “Reduces analgesia that patients with musculoskeletal problems need after

elective knee or hip arthroplasty.”

15) Of the patients who took pain medications, side effects occurred in

22.5%; these side effects included nausea, vomiting, dizziness, difficulty

concentrating, drowsiness, light-headedness, abdominal discomfort, constipation, dry mouth, itching, rash, and blurred vision.

16) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs “may increase the risk of thrombotic cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, and of gastrointestinal bleeding.”

17) “Overuse of opioid analgesics induces side effects that can delay recovery and worsen the outcome.”

18) “This is the first randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of OMT on both pain perception and functional outcomes after heart surgery.”

19) “The main results of our study are that OMT treatment decreases dramatically the level of perceived pain, and substantially improves the functional capacity in terms of inspiratory volumes.”

20) “We also observed a reduced hospitalization, on average by more than 2

days, in the OMT-treated group, that could be consequence of the improved

functional capacity.”

21) The gating mechanism of spinal manipulation would have an “analgesic effect, reducing somatic reactivity and muscle spasms.”

22) “The lower pain intensity in the OMT group at discharge suggests that OMT had a direct analgesic effect.” “The shorter duration of hospitalization

in the OMT group might suggest a more rapid functional improvement.”

23) “It can be hypothesized that the pain-relieving action of [manipulation]

enables lower doses of analgesic drugs.” “Our study suggests that [manipulation] may reduce the use of analgesic drugs, lowering the risk of adverse effects during rehabilitation programs.”

24) “The efficacy of [manipulation] on rehabilitation outcomes can therefore be summarized in terms of a more pronounced reduction in pain intensity and a greater improvement in rib cage mobility, both factors that might have played a role in shortening hospitalization.”

25) “Manipulative treatment is safe, free of side effects, and well

accepted by patients. Moreover, it is relatively inexpensive and only moderately time consuming. For these reasons, cardiac rehabilitation programs should include MT.”

26) Manipulation “should begin before the development of the respiratory

sequelae associated with reduced chest and diaphragm mobility.”

27) “We believe that adding [manipulation] to traditional care programs 1 week after surgery is neither too soon nor too late.”

28) These authors suggest that postoperative manipulation “can be expected to improve the quality of patient care and its cost efficiency, by leading to better and more rapid outcomes and by reducing morbidity.”

 

COMMENTS

 

This amazing study supports that all post surgical patients should start spinal manipulation within 5 days of surgery, during the rehabilitation process. The benefits include:

 

• Significantly reduced pain

• Significantly improved function

• Reduced hospital stay and it associated reduced costs

• Avoidance of drugs and all the risks (complications and side effects)

associated with pharmacology

Dear Total Health Family,

I have many reasons to be excited as I write this. For the past 30 years, I have had a passion of serving the Mid-South community through the power of a chiropractic adjustment.  Returning function, vitality, and life to my patients has given me joy. My patients who have been a part of our family practice for many years have seen a decline in my health and function of my feet. My hope was not lost. I was not defeated.  With the help of God, my family, colleagues, employees, and patients, I was going to find something to bring me my life back. I’m excited to say I have found 2 techniques that are giving me what I have been giving to my patients, hope! These services have changed my life so much I want to share the opportunity with my patients, so we will be bringing these technologies into our clinic! 

P.E.M.F. (Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy). What is PEMF you ask? Have you have ever held two magnets in your hands, tried to force them together, and felt a resistance? This is a magnetic field. All energy is electromagnetic and nothing happens in the body without an electromagnetic exchange between the cells. In other words, it’s treatment at the cellular level. Our cells are designed to generate energy to eliminate waste, to repair and regenerate itself, and perform its predetermined functions based on the cell’s type and location in the body.  When our cells are injured it can cause diseases such as neuropathy, pain, althimeziers, neuromuscular problems, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, etc.  By using the electromagnetic field, PEMF protects your cells, restores cellular function

PEMF uses a safe, natural electromagnetic fields which are of lower frequency and are complimentary to the chemistry and function of the body. These electromagnetic fields are for therapeutic purposes are safe unlike other man-made electromagnetic fields like power lines, microwave ovens, cell phones, etc.

  • Improves circulation & cell metabolism
  • Enhances muscle function
  • Decreases inflammation
  • Chronic & Acute Pain
  • Depression & anxiety
  • Stress Reduction
  • Bone Healing
  • Blood oxygenation
  • Average treatment time 30 minutes

Cellular Energy Transfer Science or C.E.T.S. (pronounced seets) boosts energy levels, increases vitality and achieve optimal wellness with a non-invasive & pain-free protocol.  It combines life-giving properties of water with a specialized bio-electric charge, which enhances and amplifies the body’s ability to healHeal yourself naturally without painful treatments or drugs. 

Benefits of C.E.T.S.:

  • Enhances your body’s ability to detoxify & heal
  • Increase of energy levels
  • Balances energy pathways within the body
  • Supportive therapy in cancer recovery
  • Increases stamina & endurance
  • Easing of arthritic pain & disability
  • Improves cardiovascular support
  • Strengthens neuromuscular function in M.S.
  • Symptomatic improvement in neurological conditions including Parkinson’s and stroke
  • Improves memory in Alzheimer’s disease
  • Normalizing effect in autism
  • Normalizing renal function

In closing, I found a strong overlap in the 2 different systems of cell restoration. I had my blood tests taken 2 days before beginning C.E.T.S. After 2 weeks, my blood was rechecked, and there were already positive changes. My energy level increased, and I started sleeping better. Then I added the P.E.M.F therapy with soft tissue body work in addition to the C.E.T.S. After 3 to 4 of the combo treatments, I put the cane away that I had been using since last year and haven’t picked it up since. I continually improve as I hope some of my patients will too.

In Yours in Health,

Dr. Ken

Creator of the C.E.T.S. Therapy:

Marcy Purnell is a licensed Family Nurse Practitioner and Associate Clinical Professor at the University of Memphis, Loewenberg School of Nursing • Sub-Investigator, University of Tennessee Preventive Medicine, Clinical Trials Department • NP in both acute care and clinic settings (part time )f Stern Cardiovascular Clinic • BSN from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center • MSN, FNP from the University of Memphis • Licensed in both Tennessee and Mississippi as an Advance Practice Nurse • Credentialed as a Nurse Practitioner with Baptist Hospital Systems • Ph.D candidate, University of Tennessee Health Science Center with a focus on Bioenergy

 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPy_SF0VoJw

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http://drpawluk.com/education/